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Remembering a warrior for social justice
Tue, 22 May 2018 - 14:15

Professor Jock McCulloch, who died from asbestos cancer (mesothelioma) on 18 January this year, not only distinguished himself with his research on the impact and machinations of the asbestos industry, but was also “a great friend of the people and especially the workers of South Africa”.

Mellon Mays 2018 cohort
New Mellon Mays undergrad cohort
Mon, 21 May 2018 - 13:45

The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship programme at UCT recently held a dinner to welcome five new members for 2018.

Med-tech inventors tackle anaphylaxis
Wed, 16 May 2018 - 09:15

The ZibiPen is a lifesaving piece of technology designed to deliver adrenaline during instances of anaphylaxis.

Data sharing and protection in biobank and health research
Tue, 15 May 2018 - 10:15

The South African National Bioinformatics Institute, in association with NHLS Stellenbosch University Biobank, invites you to a seminar titled: Data sharing and protection in biobank and health research at the University of the Western Cape.    

Volunteers see need through new eyes
Thu, 10 May 2018 - 08:30

The Students Health and Welfare Centres Organisation’s (SHAWCO) 750 km health tour to celebrate the organisation’s 75th anniversary was an unforgettable experience for the volunteers – and the communities they treated.

Njica Siyabonga
UCT Mellon scholar awarded prestigious scholarship to Cambridge
Mon, 23 Apr 2018 - 13:30

UCT Mellon scholar, Njica Siyabonga, has been awarded the Gates Cambridge Scholarship to read for a PhD in History at the University of Cambridge.  The Scholarship is Cambridge's most prestigious award for international postgraduates who are selected from among the top of the world's academic applicants.

DIRISA National Research Data Workshop
Mon, 23 Apr 2018 - 12:15

The National Research Data Workshop will be held on 19-21 June 2018 and is aimed at the academic and research community as well as participants who would like to share their knowledge and/or experience in data-intensive research and data management.

A new laboratory for visualising the universe
Tue, 13 Mar 2018 - 12:15

The Inter-University Institute for Data Intensive Astronomy (IDIA) has launched a new visualisation facility at the University of Cape Town: a shared space where astronomers from around the country can explore their data – and find answers to some of the biggest questions about our universe. 

CANSA Shavathon
Tue, 06 Mar 2018 - 12:45

Every year UCT medical students shave or spray their hair to raise awareness for cancer research and those living with the disease. This year the annual Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA) Shavathon took place in the CANSA-funded laboratory in the Faculty of Health Sciences on Thursday, 1 March. Robyn Walker was there to capture the colourful event.

Press release: Results from innovative tuberculosis vaccine trial show potential
Tue, 20 Feb 2018 - 11:45

Results from innovative tuberculosis vaccine trial show potential for new BCG revaccination strategies and hope for subunit vaccines.

19 February 2018 Results from innovative tuberculosis vaccine trial show potential for new BCG revaccination strategies and hope for subunit vaccines
Mon, 19 Feb 2018 - 20:00

NEW DELHI, 19 FEBRUARY 2018    -   Scientists from the University of Cape Town-based South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative (SATVI) and the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation have announced the findings of an innovative clinical trial that provides encouraging new evidence that TB vaccines could prevent sustained TB infections in high-risk adolescents. The results were presented at the 5th Global Forum on TB Vaccines in New Delhi, India 20-23 February 2018.

Grant drives genomic research
Thu, 15 Feb 2018 - 10:30

The African Academy of Sciences is awarding US$11 million to four leading African researchers to accelerate the use of genomics to better understand how the environment and human genes influence the susceptibility of Africans to certain diseases and their response to treatment.

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